August 14, 2015

Manga Review: Let's Eat Ramen and Other Doujinshi Short Stories by Nagumo, Aji-Ichi

Let's Eat Ramen and Other Doujinshi Short Stories by Nagumo, Aji-Ichi
Doujinshi, otherwise known as independent manga in Japan, is rarely published in English. In fact, it's considered underground and quite exclusive in its home country of Japan as well. Let's Eat Ramen and Other Doujinshi Short Stories finally gives western readers an exclusive look at the elusive world of contemporary Japanese doujinshi manga. Let's East Ramen is a three-part tale of Saeki, a girl who loves ramen noodles. At last, she thinks that she has finally found the perfect ramen shop, but the problem is the shop is completely full of old regulars and she can't get in. Will the timid Saeki ever summon the willpower to reach out and get the ramen that she desperately wants?
I used to read manga a couple of years ago, although I couldn't say I was a manga reader. I just read a few but really liked them. So I saw this one at NetGalley and wanted to try manga again, it has a couple of short stories, all sweet with a little bit of romance, and easy to read for beginners.

The principal story is Let's Eat Ramen, where a girl wants to eat real ramen noodles in restaurants but is to shy to go alone. It's a very simple story, I wouldn't have thought it could have a lot to explore, but it did and I'd like to know more about that girl! Who haven't been too shy sometimes to eat alone?

Doujinshi, as the synopsis explained, are independent manga and most of the time it's only published in Japan, so reading this one felt like a gift. I'll be watching these authors, who knows, maybe I'll start reading manga again!


July 13, 2015

Comics Review: Ms. Marvel (#1 - #16)

Ms. Marvel

I've heard so much about Ms. Marvel, all good things, and since I have been looking for a comic to read for a while this one sounded perfect. I started reading it with high expectations and at first I was a little bit disappointed...but then it got better.

Maybe it was because it has been a while since I read my last super heroes comics, but it seemed like Ms. Marvel wasn't too depth. It's about Kamala Khan, a Pakistani-American girl who feels like she doesn't belong. Her parents aren't very flexible and when they don't let her go to a party with boys and alcohol, she sneaks out and discovers she has powers. I don't think the 'essence' is too original, don't get me wrong, Kamala isn't a generic character and I'm very glad to read about other cultures, but ignoring that, she is just another girl with the same problems, taking illogical and irresponsible decisions (why?), that I keep finding in every YA reading. I don't remember being like that at that age but I don't know, I probably was and my mom was rolling her eyes like I do now hehe.

Ms. Marvel

I decided to continue reading and I'm glad because I did get caught with Kamala's story. It's easy to read, it has some depth moments, but it's mostly light reading and in a couple of minutes I was done. It was interesting to read about a character with a different religion, but also struggling with it. Kamala is very realistic, and I like her fun personality. There are a couple of characters from other comics that are showed in a different light, and were a nice plus. Except for Loki, who I really feel it wasn't the Loki I pictured in my mind...

Overall, it took me a while to find myself caught in this new story but it's getting better so I'm looking forward to keep reading it! Also, I really like her looks and costume...way more realistic!

July 4, 2015

Book Review: The Homecoming by Robyn Carr

The Homecoming by Robyn Carr

The Homecoming (Thunder Point #6) by Robyn Carr
In a small town, reputation is everything. In her latest novel, #1 New York Times bestselling author Robyn Carr explores the burden placed on a young man returning home to face his mistakes—the first step in claiming the life he was meant to live ...

At the age of nineteen, Seth Sileski had everything. A superb athlete and scholar, handsome and popular, he was the pride of Thunder Point. Destined for greatness, he lost it all in a terrible accident that put an end to his professional football career when it had barely begun. The people in his hometown have never forgotten what might have been.

Seth has come to terms with the turns his life has taken. But now he's been presented with an opportunity to return home and show his father—and the people of Thunder Point—he's become a better, humbler version of his former self.

Winning over his father isn't the only challenge. Seth must also find a way to convince his childhood neighbor and best friend, Iris McKinley, to forgive him for breaking her heart. With his homecoming, will Seth be able to convince the town, his family and especially Iris that he's finally ready to be the man who will make them all proud?
The Homecoming was more enjoyable that the previous book of this series, The Promise. I love these kind of stories about couples being friends and in love for a long time before getting together. Iris and Seth make a great couple, and their love story was pretty easy and quick. I do feel like some issues, like Seth's father, were left unsolved...it wasn't really explained why he was so grumpy. I think he was very misunderstood. But maybe on another book the author will explain more...

Overall, The Homecoming was a quick enjoyable romance with the perfect happy ending. Seth and Iris aren't my favorite couple of this series but they were cute and ready to be together forever and they left me feeling happy for them.


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